Liz Kingsman’s One Woman Show at the Soho theatre.

Liz Kingsman: ‘Who is this woman who feels she can go on stage and make people laugh?’ | Comedy

What does it mean to capture the zeitgeist? Liz Kingsman isn’t sure, but whatever it is, she has caught it in her efficiently titled One Woman Show, which arrives in the West End next month after a sell-out run at the Soho theatre, which won her the South Bank Sky Arts breakthrough award, and on the Edinburgh fringe. It has been hailed as a pitch-perfect takedown of the “messy woman” comedy of Fleabag’s Phoebe Waller-Bridge and others. But its lineage goes back far further than that. “When the conversation around my show was homing in on this one particular piece of work that people thought I was sending up, I was like, no, this stuff’s been going on for a lot longer,” she says.

Not least as far back as Bridget Jones’s Diary, the film version of which she watched at school in Australia, “because it’s Pride and Prejudice, in the same way that Clueless is a modern version of Emma. It’s a fun update. And ‘Come the fuck on, Bridget’ is something I still regularly say to motivate myself to do anything – like when you’re sitting on the sofa with your dog, and you haven’t got up and done your work.”

But it’s strange watching it now, Kingsman adds, “because there are some great performances but also some stuff in it that really dates, such as the way we look at women’s bodies. Bridget isn’t big, even though Renée Zellweger put on weight for the role, and yet she’s treated like she’s enormous. But there are tons of films I like watching that drive me wild with frustration, for instance because there are no women in them, but I have to try and just put that out of my brain because I’m, like, I used to enjoy this.”

When we meet for tea, around the corner from the Ambassadors theatre, where the show will run, I admit I’m nervous, because the comedy of One Woman Show is so entirely meta, and simultaneously such a merciless takedown of an all too relatably flaky woman, that I’m worried I’ll somehow get sucked into the joke machine. “You’re not allowed to be nervous,” she says, with mock outrage. “But yeah, I know what you mean. And it’s impossible to deal with those scenarios. I’ve had it recently with someone who was making jokes, but they were weird jokes. And I was like, how am I even meant to arrange my face right now?”

Liz Kingsman’s One Woman Show at the Soho theatre.
Liz Kingsman’s One Woman Show at the Soho theatre. Photograph: David Monteith-Hodge

One of the themes of the show is ambition, “the things you do to pursue your goals”, Kingsman explains. Or as her character puts it, “No one prepares you for being a grownup. I’m hurtling towards the end of my 20s and I still don’t have my shit figured out.” She doesn’t know what sort of sex she’s supposed to be having, how to square a night life with a day job, or if it’s OK to badmouth women who are more successful than her – such as her infuriatingly over-empathetic boss.

The meta-strand – of an actor making a tiny one-woman show because there aren’t enough parts for women in traditional theatre – has been given an extra twist by its move to the West End and then on to the Sydney Opera House. “The idea of this show actually growing and going into these bigger venues – well, does it make sense any more?” She’s been busy reworking it to fit: it won’t be any longer, she says, “it will just have got denser, and sillier.

“I’m getting excitable voice notes on my phone right now from the lighting designer telling me how many pixels the new lights have in them, and all I can think about is, well, how many more jokes does that mean I have to write?” Actually, she concedes, “you’re catching me in a particularly buoyant mood, because I’ve just come from rehearsing with a sound designer. We did some creative work this morning, and now I’m a bit high.”


So who is Liz Kingsman and how did she arrive so suddenly on the brink of West End stardom? “I don’t know,” she says, “it feels so at odds with the things that I find nourishing, which are alone-time and thinking and reading, and all these things that make me sound incredibly introverted. I don’t know who this woman is who thinks she can go on stage and make people laugh, so I’ve been trying to figure out where she comes from, just from a psychological point of view.”

The prosaic answer is that she came out of a Sydney childhood in which Kingsman would watch late-night comedy shows on TV with her British mother. “I was brought up on a diet of pure BBC comedy. My mum was a very bad influence on me in terms of television viewing habits. We’d go to the library and rent DVDs and then binge-watch them until 2am on a school night.” Kingsman knew all about Smack the Pony, Big Train and The Mighty Boosh but nothing about American comedy. “When The Simpsons comes up, I still go very quiet, because it’s like not having seen The Godfather or something.”

Both her parents are graphic designers and she is their only child. They are as baffled as she is by the turn her life has taken, she says. She wanted to do physics at school, thinking it would help her to become a director, but dropped it because of a timetabling clash with drama. “They insist that they’ve always known I was going to be a writer, because I did a lot of writing as a kid. The curveball for them was the performer side. And I still don’t think they can join the dots, but I can’t either, because I’m very private. I really don’t ever want to be funny as myself. I would never want to become a presenter or go on a panel show.”

After school, Kingsman moved to the UK for an English literature degree at Durham University, where she hooked up with the first of a series of friendship groups, including Stevie Martin and Tessa Coates (of Nobody Panic podcast fame) with whom she teamed up as the cult YouTube sketch trio Massive Dad.

She went on to live in north London as part of an eight-person houseshare of a four-bedroom house. “One person was genuinely living on a mattress in the pantry. That group is really good at going on holidays, so I look in my diary and say, ‘Oh, I’m going to Tuscany this summer. Who knew?’”

She’s also part of an all-male WhatsApp group who go on Imax outings to see space shows: “Anything that’s big and spacey, Christopher Nolan-esque is an Imax experience.” Finally, and most importantly to the life of One Woman Show, there’s the all-woman improv group she met through weekly comedy evenings at a fringe theatre, the De Beauvoir Arms. They formed a group called Sorry, who were due to provide half of the bill when she first trialled One Woman Show at the Vault festival in 2020. “The idea was that I was going to do half an hour of this thing I’d written, then they were going to come and save the night.” But her material grew to an hour, so they had to throw in an interval and extend the evening.

Photograph by Perou. Hair and makeup by Celine Nonon.
Photograph by Perou. Hair and makeup by Celine Nonon.

The final preview night was a few days before the first lockdown. “Then we sat on the show for a year and a half while I spent every waking minute playing with my puppy.” It’s a cockapoo named Emmett, after Emmett Brown from Back to the Future. They moved down to Dorset, after she did a property search on an estate agent’s rental website: garden, two bedrooms, dog, anywhere in Britain.

Unlike one location of the 2019 comedy series Down from London, in which Kingsman and Graham Dickson starred as an odd couple trying to fix their relationship with awaydays, her home is not by the sea. But it’s just close enough to London and its Eurostar terminal to allow her to keep up her other life as a rising star of French TV comedy. She’s currently working on two French shows: a third series of Parlement, set and filmed in the European parliament and broadcast in Germany and France (she plays an English parliamentary assistant), and the first series of Icon of French Cinema, about a French Hollywood star returning to Paris. “So I’m between Paris and Strasbourg and London, which is not as glamorous as it sounds: it’s just a lot of Eurostar food.”

It also gives her time to write. She’s not speedy, as she learned when she was briefly hired for a news-based daily comedy show on a visit to see her dad in Australia. “It was so satisfying to discover that I never want to be in that kind of environment where you have to write a joke under pressure,” she says. But she knows she has a story to tell. As her character, ironically, says in the play: “women can be flawed and chaotic, they can experience self-loathing and jealousy, and they can be up themselves or narcissistic or crude and abusive. The more we showcase those qualities the stronger we get. We need more women’s story.”

  • One Woman Show is at the Ambassadors theatre, London WC2, from 14 December to 21 January


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Liz Kingsman’s One Woman Show at the Soho theatre.

Liz Kingsman: ‘The more we showcase women’s negative qualities, the stronger we get’ | Comedy

What does it mean to capture the zeitgeist? Liz Kingsman isn’t sure, but whatever it is, she has caught it in her efficiently titled One Woman Show, which arrives in the West End next month after a sell-out run at the Soho theatre, which won her the South Bank Sky Arts breakthrough award, and on the Edinburgh fringe. It has been hailed as a pitch-perfect takedown of the “messy woman” comedy of Fleabag’s Phoebe Waller-Bridge and others. But its lineage goes back far further than that. “When the conversation around my show was homing in on this one particular piece of work that people thought I was sending up, I was like, no, this stuff’s been going on for a lot longer,” she says.

Not least as far back as Bridget Jones’s Diary, the film version of which she watched at school in Australia, “because it’s Pride and Prejudice, in the same way that Clueless is a modern version of Emma. It’s a fun update. And ‘Come the fuck on, Bridget’ is something I still regularly say to motivate myself to do anything – like when you’re sitting on the sofa with your dog, and you haven’t got up and done your work.”

But it’s strange watching it now, Kingsman adds, “because there are some great performances but also some stuff in it that really dates, such as the way we look at women’s bodies. Bridget isn’t big, even though Renée Zellweger put on weight for the role, and yet she’s treated like she’s enormous. But there are tons of films I like watching that drive me wild with frustration, for instance because there are no women in them, but I have to try and just put that out of my brain because I’m, like, I used to enjoy this.”

When we meet for tea, around the corner from the Ambassadors theatre, where the show will run, I admit I’m nervous, because the comedy of One Woman Show is so entirely meta, and simultaneously such a merciless takedown of an all too relatably flaky woman, that I’m worried I’ll somehow get sucked into the joke machine. “You’re not allowed to be nervous,” she says, with mock outrage. “But yeah, I know what you mean. And it’s impossible to deal with those scenarios. I’ve had it recently with someone who was making jokes, but they were weird jokes. And I was like, how am I even meant to arrange my face right now?”

Liz Kingsman’s One Woman Show at the Soho theatre.
Liz Kingsman’s One Woman Show at the Soho theatre. Photograph: David Monteith-Hodge

One of the themes of the show is ambition, “the things you do to pursue your goals”, Kingsman explains. Or as her character puts it, “No one prepares you for being a grownup. I’m hurtling towards the end of my 20s and I still don’t have my shit figured out.” She doesn’t know what sort of sex she’s supposed to be having, how to square a night life with a day job, or if it’s OK to badmouth women who are more successful than her – such as her infuriatingly over-empathetic boss.

The meta-strand – of an actor making a tiny one-woman show because there aren’t enough parts for women in traditional theatre – has been given an extra twist by its move to the West End and then on to the Sydney Opera House. “The idea of this show actually growing and going into these bigger venues – well, does it make sense any more?” She’s been busy reworking it to fit: it won’t be any longer, she says, “it will just have got denser, and sillier.

“I’m getting excitable voice notes on my phone right now from the lighting designer telling me how many pixels the new lights have in them, and all I can think about is, well, how many more jokes does that mean I have to write?” Actually, she concedes, “you’re catching me in a particularly buoyant mood, because I’ve just come from rehearsing with a sound designer. We did some creative work this morning, and now I’m a bit high.”


So who is Liz Kingsman and how did she arrive so suddenly on the brink of West End stardom? “I don’t know,” she says, “it feels so at odds with the things that I find nourishing, which are alone-time and thinking and reading, and all these things that make me sound incredibly introverted. I don’t know who this woman is who thinks she can go on stage and make people laugh, so I’ve been trying to figure out where she comes from, just from a psychological point of view.”

The prosaic answer is that she came out of a Sydney childhood in which Kingsman would watch late-night comedy shows on TV with her British mother. “I was brought up on a diet of pure BBC comedy. My mum was a very bad influence on me in terms of television viewing habits. We’d go to the library and rent DVDs and then binge-watch them until 2am on a school night.” Kingsman knew all about Smack the Pony, Big Train and The Mighty Boosh but nothing about American comedy. “When The Simpsons comes up, I still go very quiet, because it’s like not having seen The Godfather or something.”

Both her parents are graphic designers and she is their only child. They are as baffled as she is by the turn her life has taken, she says. She wanted to do physics at school, thinking it would help her to become a director, but dropped it because of a timetabling clash with drama. “They insist that they’ve always known I was going to be a writer, because I did a lot of writing as a kid. The curveball for them was the performer side. And I still don’t think they can join the dots, but I can’t either, because I’m very private. I really don’t ever want to be funny as myself. I would never want to become a presenter or go on a panel show.”

After school, Kingsman moved to the UK for an English literature degree at Durham University, where she hooked up with the first of a series of friendship groups, including Stevie Martin and Tessa Coates (of Nobody Panic podcast fame) with whom she teamed up as the cult YouTube sketch trio Massive Dad.

She went on to live in north London as part of an eight-person houseshare of a four-bedroom house. “One person was genuinely living on a mattress in the pantry. That group is really good at going on holidays, so I look in my diary and say, ‘Oh, I’m going to Tuscany this summer. Who knew?’”

She’s also part of an all-male WhatsApp group who go on Imax outings to see space shows: “Anything that’s big and spacey, Christopher Nolan-esque is an Imax experience.” Finally, and most importantly to the life of One Woman Show, there’s the all-woman improv group she met through weekly comedy evenings at a fringe theatre, the De Beauvoir Arms. They formed a group called Sorry, who were due to provide half of the bill when she first trialled One Woman Show at the Vault festival in 2020. “The idea was that I was going to do half an hour of this thing I’d written, then they were going to come and save the night.” But her material grew to an hour, so they had to throw in an interval and extend the evening.

Photograph by Perou. Hair and makeup by Celine Nonon.
Photograph by Perou. Hair and makeup by Celine Nonon.

The final preview night was a few days before the first lockdown. “Then we sat on the show for a year and a half while I spent every waking minute playing with my puppy.” It’s a cockapoo named Emmett, after Emmett Brown from Back to the Future. They moved down to Dorset, after she did a property search on an estate agent’s rental website: garden, two bedrooms, dog, anywhere in Britain.

Unlike one location of the 2019 comedy series Down from London, in which Kingsman and Graham Dickson starred as an odd couple trying to fix their relationship with awaydays, her home is not by the sea. But it’s just close enough to London and its Eurostar terminal to allow her to keep up her other life as a rising star of French TV comedy. She’s currently working on two French shows: a third series of Parlement, set and filmed in the European parliament and broadcast in Germany and France (she plays an English parliamentary assistant), and the first series of Icon of French Cinema, about a French Hollywood star returning to Paris. “So I’m between Paris and Strasbourg and London, which is not as glamorous as it sounds: it’s just a lot of Eurostar food.”

It also gives her time to write. She’s not speedy, as she learned when she was briefly hired for a news-based daily comedy show on a visit to see her dad in Australia. “It was so satisfying to discover that I never want to be in that kind of environment where you have to write a joke under pressure,” she says. But she knows she has a story to tell. It’s that “women can be flawed and chaotic, they can experience self-loathing and jealousy, and they can be up themselves or narcissistic or crude and abusive. The more we showcase those qualities the stronger we get. We need more on the story of women.”

  • One Woman Show is at the Ambassadors theatre, London WC2, from 14 December to 21 January


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SEI_134889335-d37a_1669314803.jpg

Liz Kingsman talks being put in ‘catfight territory’ with Fleabag

The headlines have only proved the point of One Woman Show, says Kingsman (Picture: Will Bremridge)

One thing Liz Kingsman wants to make clear is that she is not a comedian. ‘I see a comedian as being a person who can be funny as themselves and I can’t do that,’ she explains. ‘I would never be able to present a TV show or even go on a panel show.’

Still, that hasn’t stopped her attracting headlines like, ‘Is this the funniest woman in Britain?’ over the last year thanks to her sensational, hysterical One Woman Show.

She remains nonplussed about the hype she has generated – ‘it’s all an invention, right?’ Nevertheless, that hype has led to the show earning a six-week run in the West End, quite something for a solo performer.

Trying to describe One Woman Show is a bit of a fool’s errand. It sees Liz play an absurd, fictional version of herself, an actor/writer desperate to become the designated ‘successful woman’ for the year so has decided to capitalise on the appetite for shows about ‘messy’ millennial heroines a la Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s Fleabag by creating her own.

Called Wildfowl, it is a monologue centring on another oh-so-chaotic, sexually frank twentysomething. As her performance of Wildfowl proceeds, though, there are various interruptions, due to her supposedly trying to record the show for a TV producer, among other things.

The end result is a brilliant satire about the limiting ways women are portrayed on stage and screen, even if the original intention was less deep than that, Liz says. ‘It probably feels like this was a vehicle to say something. But it never was – I was just seeing some things that I felt were a pattern. And my reaction to that was, “That’s quite funny”. And then you just want to write a joke version.’

One Woman Show is about a – you guessed it – one woman show, called Wildfowl (Picture: Supplied)
Liz says she didn’t intend to make the show so deep, but just thought the premise was funny (Picture: Joel Saget/AFP)

Liz first trialled the show in March 2020 at London’s Vault festival, before the pandemic put the brakes on everything. Then, after significant recalibrating with director Adam Brace, the finished version opened at London’s Soho Theatre last October, and was an instant hit.

The response, Liz says, has been ‘constantly surprising’, including how the show has been framed in some of the coverage to sound like a direct attack on Waller-Bridge’s show – ‘Take that Fleabag!’ said one newspaper – rather than something much more offbeat and affectionately funny. ‘You could say that some of the headlines that leaned a little bit into the catfight territory are making my point for me,’ she says.

Phoebe Waller-Bridge holds multiple Emmys for Fleabag in 2019 (Picture: Shutterstock)

Nevertheless, there is obvious irony in the fact that the last one woman show to make a big splash in the West End was, indeed, Fleabag. And as Liz prepares to move the show into the Ambassadors Theatre, she says she’s going through a ‘tricky negotiation’ about how to adapt it to the bigger space. ‘I want it to expand like a gas to fill the space. So what I’ve effectively said there is “my show is like a gas”,’ she laughs.

Originally from Australia, but with a British mother, Liz grew up in Sydney before moving over here to study English at Durham University, where she spent a lot of time doing comedy shows and plays. But, after leaving, she decided to work behind the scenes doing a series of runner jobs on big films.

She sometimes found herself standing in for stars like Felicity Jones and Natalie Portman, and that was a cause of ‘envy, because when they were ready for the take, the real actor would arrive and then get to do it, obviously, and I’d think, “No, but I was doing such a good job.”’

Another one woman show from Kingsman is unfortunately off the cards (Picture: Photographise.com)

After making the leap into acting full-time, her biggest screen role has been in a French series, Parlement, which is a political sitcom akin to The Thick Of It but set around the EU parliament.

Currently she is filming the third series, simultaneously with another Gallic show, Icon Of French Cinema. The opportunities across the Channel have been a pleasant surprise, she says – confirming to her that the way an actor’s career often pans out is less down to deliberate choices, and more ‘a complete fluke’.

Having starred in shows with mundane, everyday settings, she’s got her heart set on projects that will involve more fantastical locales. ‘What I’m saying is I’d like to go to space,’ she laughs. ‘And I don’t mean that metaphorically. I mean somebody put me in a moon film.’

Can we expect another one woman show? Unlikely, she admits. ‘I’ve burnt my own bridge, so I can’t do that’, though she has ideas for a couple of non-solo theatre projects. ‘We’ll chat about them when I’ve made them in ten years,’ she says, wryly. ‘So if we could lock in a zoom conversation for then, that would be great.’

One Woman Show is at London’s Ambassadors Theatre from Dec 14 to Jan 21 2023

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MORE : Who could win I’m A Celebrity 2022? Latest odds revealed


MORE : Phoebe Waller-Bridge won’t be replacing Harrison Ford says Indiana Jones director




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Edinburgh Comedy Awards: 2022 shortlist revealed | Times2

Issues of mental health, class and gender politics all feature in the ten-strong shortlist for the Edinburgh Comedy Awards, announced today. Yet, in the longest list in the awards’ 41-year history, the real joy has been the lightness of touch brought to such issues.

As the Times comedy critic, I’ve also been one of the ten judges who have sifted through all the eligible shows to come up with a list of (deep breath) Alfie Brown, Colin Hoult, the Delightful Sausage, Jordan Gray, Josh Pugh, Larry Dean, Lauren Pattison, Liz Kingsman, Sam Campbell and Seann Walsh. I’m not allowed to relay any judges’ thoughts except my own, but it’s fair to say that none of us can be sure who will be the big winner


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King Charles III’s security guard is ‘a real Kingsman’: royal fans

King Charles III’s security guard is ‘a real Kingsman’: royal fans
King Charles III’s security guard is ‘a real Kingsman’: royal fans

King Charles III’s security guard has become a hot topic for netizens as royal fans believe that the personnel is a real-life Kingsman spy.

A video of the security guard walking in and out of Buckingham Palace with a fancy umbrella has been making rounds on TikTok.

The eagle-eyed social media users pointed out a detail on the umbrella claiming that it is a gun in disguise.

One TikTok user wrote: “A real Kingsman!” while another added: “That thing he’s holding is a GUNbrella, not an umbrella.”

King Charles III’s security guard is ‘a real Kingsman’: royal fans

“What is he a Kingsman secret agent?” a third comment read.

“I thought he was the new 007,” a fourth added.

This came after a viral picture of the same security guard spotted a gun poking out of his blazer when Charles greeted the mourners for the first time as a King.


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992501_071442_updates.jpg

Royal fans think King Charles III’s security guard is real ‘Kingsman spy’

Royal fans think King Charles III’s security guard is real Kingsman spy
Royal fans think King Charles III’s security guard is real ‘Kingsman spy’

Royal fans have been debating about King Charles III’s security guard who they believe  is a real-life Kingsman spy.

A video of the security guard walking in and out of Buckingham Palace with a fancy umbrella has been making rounds on TikTok.

The eagle-eyed social media users pointed out a detail on the umbrella claiming that it is a gun in disguise.

One TikTok user wrote: “A real Kingsman!” while another added: “That thing he’s holding is a GUNbrella, not an umbrella.”

Royal fans think King Charles III’s security guard is real Kingsman spy

“What is he a Kingsman secret agent?” a third comment read.

“I thought he was the new 007,” a fourth added.

This came after a viral picture of the same security guard spotted a gun poking out of his blazer when Charles greeted the mourners for the first time as a King.


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Latest Cryto-Cash ‘Back Gold’ Currency Fails ‘Real Asset’ Sniff-Test; Monetary Circulation ‘Stalls’ in Cheyenne Wyoming – World News Report

All that is gold does not glitter, not all those who wander are lost; the old that is strong does not wither, deep roots are not reached by the frost. -Tolkien

Don’t gain the world and lose your soul; wisdom is better than silver and gold.”

— Bob Marley

PROVO, UTAH, UNITED STATES, October 13, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Since Cryto-Investments are still unregulated, it is easy for crooks to set up fictitious monetary exchanges that con investors with promises of high returns and low risk where victims are convinced to deposit funds that can never be withdrawn.

| BEWARE OF FAKE CURRENCIES | FRAUD | COUNTERFEIT MONEY |

SOURCES:

.SoftwareTestingHelp.com/gold-backed-cryptocurrency/

.LearnAboutGold.com/blog/gold-backed-cryptocurrency/

.CoinTelegraph.com/news/what-is-a-gold-backed-token-and-how-does-it-work/

.AnalyticsInsight.net/top-10-gold-backed-cryptocurrencies-to-buy-and-hold-for-stability/

.CurrencyAssociation.org/

.UnitedProspectors.com/

.ipmi.org/

.epmf.be/

At various times throughout history, world trade operated on a de facto gold standard. Gold was used as money throughout the world. This arrangement arose organically as early as the 7th century BCE. The height of the “classical” period of the gold standard was the 18th and 19th centuries. Under this system, a government could only issue money if there were enough gold reserves to back its value. The banknotes and copper coins that circulated around the economy were supposed to be redeemable for gold specie (gold coins).

This was in addition to actual gold coins struck by government mints up until 1933. But for the most part gold only migrated between large commercial banks. For everyday commerce, paper money and coins made of other metals were used far more commonly. Although gold was indeed money, in practice it functioned more like bank reserves.

Domestically, the gold standard placed a restriction on spending by the federal government. In the absence of a major gold rush, it imposed some measure of fiscal discipline on the U.S. Congress. Government could only ignore this restriction at the expense of devaluing its currency. (This is why the gold standard was often suspended during wartime, allowing a government to spend freely on war mobilization.)

Perhaps the most important benefit of a gold standard, however, was its international implications. Unlike today’s foreign exchange market, which is characterized by floating exchange rates between currencies, the world under the gold standard used gold as a universal measuring stick. Currencies could still fluctuate in value, but the changes were measured in terms of gold.

For example, to combat the Great Depression, the Roosevelt administration adjusted the gold price from roughly $21 per troy ounce in 1932 to $35/oz by 1934. In essence that meant the purchasing power of the dollar declined by two-thirds, losing 67% of its value versus gold. By 1971, President Nixon “closed the gold window”—thereby ending the U.S. dollar’s direct convertibility to gold.

Despite its benefits, the gold standard was hardly perfect. It was periodically suspended, at times it was abused by government officials, and it wasn’t uniformly adopted by every country on the planet. Nonetheless, adhering to a gold standard created a consistent standard for the value of money all around the world. https://www.gainesvillecoins.com/blog/is-money-backed-by-gold

The PMA will fill that void and offer industry experts to legislative and regulatory officials tasked with oversight of our industry. The PMA will now have a seat at the table when crucial discussions are underway on how best to promulgate and enforce rules without overly interfering in precious metals commerce. The PMA will open channels and begin to engage in a substantive manner with the two main regulatory bodies with oversight of our industry:

· Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), an independent agency that regulates the U.S. derivatives markets and has precious metals jurisdiction

· Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), an independent agency that holds primary responsibility for enforcing and regulating the securities industry

The Compliance Auditing/Detection Committee implements auditing standards for our retail Members and reports on any compliance issues discovered through auditing. This Committee is charged with developing and maintaining procedures that examine, analyze, and report on sales practices to provide substantive feedback for our retail Members. This feedback allows our retail Members to provide consistent and compliant sales practices—setting them apart from the rest of the industry.

The Compliance Procedures and Manuals Committee focuses on standardizing compliance procedures and requirements for our retail Members. This Committee reviews and discusses best practices to implement to help maintain a high level of integrity within each retail Members sales process. The Compliance Enforcement/Remediation Committee focuses on addressing known issues with compliant sales practices and advising retail Members on how to best address issues or complaints when they are identified. This Committee establishes suggested guidelines for remediation for our retail Members.

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Founding Membership includes all benefits listed below as well as:

• The option to select an individual for election on the Board of Directors.

• The prestige of displaying Founding Member of the PMA on company materials.

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Gold Membership includes all benefits listed below as well as:

• The Member’s corporate compliance personnel and corporate executive staff are all included as individual Members of the PMA and can join Committees and Member meetings.

• Members will have the option to select individuals from their organization for placement on a Committee(s).

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Silver Member:

Silver Membership includes all benefits listed below as well as:

• Members have free access to best practices publications.

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Bronze Membership includes all benefits listed below:

• Members receives recognition on the PMA’s website and materials.

• Members receive email updates with helpful information on matters concerning the industry and activities taken on by the Committees.

• Members gain access to all Committee materials and reports, which include resources, best practice guidelines, and more.

• Members will receive annual updates from all Committees.

• Members will gain the prestige of displaying membership in the PMA on company materials.

• Members will have the ability to utilize the PMA’s Dispute Resolution resources.

• Members receive email updates with helpful information on matters concerning the industry and activities taken on by the Committees.

• Members will be eligible to register to attend Member meetings and events, which will include round-table discussions.

• Members receive access to PMA Membership and Partner contact Directory.

• Members receive discounts with PMA partners.

{$1,000}

Is Money Backed By Gold?

NO, money is not backed by gold, nor by any other commodity. It hasn’t been since 1971. Experts have spent careers studying and researching monetary history. Experts focus on gold’s role in this regard—but it’s fascinating how many different materials have been used as money throughout human history. At various times, even up through the 18th century, people around the world used many forms of commodity money:

-salt

-tobacco

-wheat

-cowry shells

-beads

-small tools

-feathers

-animal pelts

You can learn more about the “strange” items used as currency by listening to this episode of the Breaking the Dollar podcast ( .gainesvillecoins.com/podcast/strange-currency-history ). This isn’t an exhaustive list. Not by a long shot! But it should give you an idea of how money is simply a representation of value. Money facilitates trade and is more efficient than simple barter. Theoretically, anything could be used to fill this role. Yet one will find that some materials functioned better as money than others did. Gold proved to be the best among them, for reasons we will discuss below.

Fiat Money Is Not Backed By Gold: The most recent polling from 2019 suggests that as high as 30% of the American population mistakenly believes that the U.S. dollar is backed by gold. An additional 4% of people believe it is backed by oil. This brings up an important term called fiat money. It simply describes a currency that derives its value from government decree. In other words, fiat money has value merely because the government says so. While fiat currency has no intrinsic value, that doesn’t mean it’s inherently worthless. First and foremost, currencies are always accepted by the governments that issue them as a payment for taxes. The value of legal tender money is also backed by “the full faith and credit” of that government. Moreover, it’s worth keeping in mind that fiat currencies can be backed by intangible things. In the case of the U.S. dollar, its value partly derives from macroeconomic factors:

-the large size of the U.S. economy relative to other countries

-the fact that foreign central banks hold many dollars as a reserve asset

-the strong network of trade alliances enjoyed by the United States

-the strength of the American military, or the threat thereof

WHO CAN YOU TRUST?

Precious Metals Association (PMA ): The Precious Metals Association (“PMA”) is a trade association of physical precious metals industry stakeholders dedicated to protecting and promoting the integrity of a valuable alternative investment and collector industry. The PMA endeavors to facilitate education, communication, and cooperation among industry members regarding best practices, compliance procedures, and current events impacting PMA Members. The PMA was founded by industry leaders for the benefit of the industry and its valued customers and partners.

ONE VOICE

The Legislation Committee spearheads the PMA’s efforts to advocate for the precious metals retail industry in state and federal legislative bodies. The PMA’s Board of Directors sets annual goals and agendas for the Committee to pursue in an effort to raise awareness of the industry’s needs and operations, to track and lobby on relevant legislation, and to educate Members on pending or new legislation of import to the precious metals retail industry. The Committee also seeks to interface with other relevant stakeholders and policy makers.

The Legislation Committee strives to be aware and provide notice of any state and federal legislative developments with the assistance of the PMA’s lobbying firm in Washington, D.C. The PMA will be highly active in the public policy arena in Washington, DC. With ONE VOICE, the PMA will pro-actively engage legislative and regulatory leaders at the U.S. federal government level on all matters involving the buying and selling of precious metals.

In 2021, the PMA’s main Washington mission will be to have U.S. regulatory officials, members of Congress, industry stakeholders, and opinion leaders (news media) view and involve the PMA as the industry experts and standard on matters involving precious metals. In recent years, federal regulatory bodies with jurisdiction over precious metals have become more visible and active in enforcement matters. And, until now, there has been no industry association that these regulatory agencies can work with, reply upon, and trust to offer unvarnished facts, provide real-word and on-the ground experience, and to collaborate with on new rules, regulations, and laws governing our industry. https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/09/gold-standard.asp

Does This Mean Our Money Is Worthless?

In a word, NO. It does mean that our money is subject to the effects of inflation and won’t hold its value over time. Our current regime of fiat money is not designed to reward saving money. That’s one of the main reasons why people make investments. It’s best to think of money as a tool. It’s a medium of exchange and a unit of account. Unfortunately, it’s just not a reliable store of value. Money is useful (and worth something) by virtue of what it can buy. On top of that, with our current system of floating exchange rates, there’s a trade-off involved when a currency is “strong” or “weak”: a weaker currency makes a country’s exports more attractive, while a stronger currency has the opposite effect. Yet a strong currency increases a country’s purchasing power for imports.

In short: gold is no longer used as money, but simply saving money is not an investment in the future.

https://www.businessinsider.com/are-there-any-currencies-backed-by-gold-2012-3

John Oro
Gold Inc.
+1 801-892-6002
email us here




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